Thursday, May 21, 2015

Bleeding Vocal Cords (Part 2). Post Operative Care.


We all know that whichever health problems we have, the best way to conquer them is, first of all, to prevent it.

However, if it already happened, the second best way to deal with it is non-surgically, if possible.

The third apparent way is to embark on a surgical procedure. However, the latter is much more dangerous than the other two options.

Look at the case of Julie Andrews; after undergoing a botched vocal surgery in 1997, she lost her ability to sing forever and never regained her real singing voice ever since.

Joan Rivers, not too long ago, went to a prestigious New York hospital to the outpatient ward to remove a simple polyp and, as a result, she never came out of the operation room.

And lastly, there is Sam Smith, who luckily came out of the O.R, but with no ability to speak for quite a few weeks.

The rest remains to be seen.

I wish him all the best and a full recovery of his vocal injury. However, with the best scenario, what is going to change after the vocal surgery? Hopefully, the vocal cords will be repaired and the bleeding will stop.

For how long though?

In other words, the “instrument” is going to be fixed, but what about the “player”?

Let’s suppose that the most famous pianist, Liberace, would try to extract the sound from his pink Grand Piano, hammering at it; what would happen to that famous Grand Piano he was transporting, along with him, everywhere he was touring? Let’s presume that it happened and the famous pianist found a famous piano repair specialist. Liberace paid him enough money to fix his favorite Grand Piano.

Now what?

Poor Liberace is still continually hammering the aforementioned Grand Piano.

So take a wild guess… What happens next?

It is very easy to guess; his famous pink Grand Piano will be ruined one more time again.

If you are still wondering why, this is the answer…

Because nothing had changed! The instrument was fixed, but the player is still hammering… 
So, if any singer undergoes a vocal surgery will continue singing in the same manner as he did before, no doubts the problem will reoccur and might get even worse the second time around.

Look at John Mayer.

He removed one polyp, than regained two. Then removed two and regained more.

And lastly, look at Adele’s case.


After bleeding polyp surgery and five month of silence after the fact, she luckily regained most of her voice.

But when (right before embarking on the performance at the Grammy Awards in 2012, she was asked by the interviewer, who happened to be (CNN’s news caster), Anderson Cooper; “Do you think that it could happen to you ever again? “

Without any hesitation, Adele replied, ABSOLUTELY!

The interviewer asked, “why”?

Adele replied, with absolute certainty  “If I decide to go on a 200-date world tour, it would happen again."

That said, being smart and aware that nothing had changed with respect of her vocal technique whatsoever, she then totally knew that the initial voice problem would occur over and over again.

We all know that she never went on any tour after her vocal surgery.

As a matter of fact, I know that she wanted to take a five-year break right after that occurrence.

The whole ordeal scared her out of her wits, understandably so.

Since she had the understanding that her vocal application and technique of doing it before the vocal injury has not been altered in any shape or form, evidently, the new vocal injury will occur over and over again.

The moral of it is: there is no change, without change.

If the vocal application and vocal technique are not modified in such a way that the vocal cords and the whole vocal anatomy would be released from the pressure of the sound, the vocal injury will, no doubt, occur again and again…

If you are interested to find out more details on Non-Surgical voice repair and post operative care, please give Diana Yampolsky a call for a free consultation on any of the voice issues or vocal problems you, or your loved one(s) might have.

416-857-8741
www.repairyourvoice.com

Wednesday, May 20, 2015

Untreatable Voice Diseases Should you give up and learn how to live with this disorder?


Indeed, should you give up, or rather do something, which will (at least) improve the quality of your life?

What are those untreatable, nasty voice disorders?

It definitely is vocal paralysis (paresis) or both vocal cords, the severe forms of spasmodic dysphonia, the severe forms of muscle tension dysphonia, scar tissue on the vocal cords, damaged vocal box and it’s anatomy due to/or during the surgical procedure and many more others .

Once, not too long ago, in my office/studio walked in a middle-aged, pretty handsome Asian man with his wife. It was very sad to try to speak with the man, as there was nothing else coming out of his mouth but mooing.

I could not understand one word he was trying to say. Then his wife took over the “conversation”.

She told us a story that her husband had a cancer of thyroid. Then the doctors first were trying to get rid of the cancer, they conducted a surgical procedure, which had paralyzed one of his vocal cords (vocal paresis).

Then he was suggested to undergo chemotherapy and radiation treatments, which, naturally, worsened his voice condition.

He became even more raspy and hoarse and then became hardly understood.

Then doctors decided to proceed with the second operation to remove the remaining cancer from his thyroid.

After he came out of the second surgery, his second vocal cord was also completely paralyzed.

How horrible it might be for the man in his mid-40’s to have communication difficulties, to the point that he could not form any sensible words! He came with the hope that I will offer him a magic pill and a magic cure…?

On one hand, of course, you cannot blame him that he was looking for a miracle.

On the other hand, how realistic is that?

I have explained to him that his condition cannot be cured, either by me or anybody else for that matter.

But what I could have done for him is improve the quality of his speaking; to improve clarity, annunciation and pronunciation, if not for all words, but for the majority of the words.

How would I do this, you may ask?

With the great difficulty, a lot of patience, huge intensity on both of our parts, employing the tedious Vocal Science ™ method and all of my 40 years experience, dealing with the health related (and other kinds) of voice/vocal disorders.

I would teach him how to speak, employing facial muscles, the use of which would make his voice at least 4 times more resonant and amplified.

Also, employing along with facial muscles, the abdominal muscles, would allow him to have a greater support of the sound, the proper lift of the sound off of the vocal box and thus he would become more understood, which means his confidence would be improved by far and the quality of life would be more enhanced and escalated.

Unfortunately, my prospective client could not understand how he could use the different muscles (facial muscles working in full conjunction and coordination with the abdominal muscles) and not the vocal cords.

Too bad for him because, as far as I am concerned, this tedious and intense, syllable-on-syllable, word-on-word Vocal Science™ technique is the only hope he had.

Evidently, not all vocal severe damages are curable, but almost all of them are treatable to some degree.

It requires the understanding, willingness and 'lovingness', an open heart & soul and true belief in the improvement of one’s condition.

Without the above, there is no point for any of the parties involved, to embark on such, not very easy at all, endeavor.

If you find this content informative and helpful, please refer to our websites for more detailed information, or give Diana Yampolsky a call for a free consultation on any of the vocal problems you, or your loved one(s) might have.

416-857-8741

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